The New Home for the Sheet Metal Industry Forums
SheetMetalTalk
 


Go Back   Sheetmetal Talk > Sheet Metal Forums > Sheet Metal Products

Sheet Metal Products
Discuss sheet metal products here. What products makes your job easier. No advertising on forums, it will be deleted.
 


Share This Forum!  
 
 
     

 

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-19-2012, 05:30 AM
boonesborough boonesborough is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default 26 gauge?

My local vendor can not get any 26 ga sheet, hot or cold rolled. I have looked at Lowes, Fastenal, McMaster Carr with no luck.
Any other sources?

Shay Lelegren
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-19-2012, 06:02 AM
roofermarc roofermarc is offline
Professional Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: St.Tammany Parish
Posts: 449
Thanks: 36
Thanked 82 Times in 71 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by boonesborough View Post
My local vendor can not get any 26 ga sheet, hot or cold rolled. I have looked at Lowes, Fastenal, McMaster Carr with no luck.
Any other sources?

Shay Lelegren
Try a sheetmetal supply company! Those stores you mentioned wouldn't know a good product if it jumped up and bit them on there ass. Just saying.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-19-2012, 12:09 PM
boonesborough boonesborough is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

My local sheet metal supply can not get any. Roofermarc does your supplier carry it or have they stopped making it?

Shay Lelegren
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-20-2012, 06:26 AM
roofermarc roofermarc is offline
Professional Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: St.Tammany Parish
Posts: 449
Thanks: 36
Thanked 82 Times in 71 Posts
Default

I read that hot rolled is just regular sheetmetal.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-21-2012, 09:02 PM
Dan Piazza Dan Piazza is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Melbourne, Florida
Posts: 14
Thanks: 1
Thanked 8 Times in 4 Posts
Default

Try a local steel supply source or contact a local welding shop to find out where they get their supplies from. Most sheet metal suppliers that I've contacted through the years don't handle bare steel, only galvanized, stainless, copper, and aluminum. Also, I've never seen hot-rolled available in thickness under 16-gauge, while cold-rolled is available in 30- through 10-gauge. Good luck.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-23-2012, 12:31 PM
tnbndr tnbndr is offline
Professional Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Midwest, USA
Posts: 309
Thanks: 1
Thanked 28 Times in 24 Posts
Default

Simple explanation of the differences. Google hot rolled steel vs. cold rolled steel and there are numerous articles. Biggest difference is price.

http://www.spaco.org/hrvscr.htm
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-23-2012, 02:38 PM
roofermarc roofermarc is offline
Professional Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: St.Tammany Parish
Posts: 449
Thanks: 36
Thanked 82 Times in 71 Posts
Default Confused still

Hot rolling


A coil of hot-rolled steel


See also: Hot working
Hot rolling is a metalworking process that occurs above the recrystallization temperature of the material. After the grains deform during processing, they recrystallize, which maintains an equiaxed microstructure and prevents the metal from work hardening. The starting material is usually large pieces of metal, like semi-finished casting products, such as slabs, blooms, and billets. If these products came from a continuous casting operation the products are usually fed directly into the rolling mills at the proper temperature. In smaller operations the material starts at room temperature and must be heated. This is done in a gas- or oil-fired soaking pit for larger workpieces and for smaller workpieces induction heating is used. As the material is worked the temperature must be monitored to make sure it remains above the recrystallization temperature. To maintain a safety factor a finishing temperature is defined above the recrystallization temperature; this is usually 50 to 100 °C (90 to 180 °F) above the recrystallization temperature. If the temperature does drop below this temperature the material must be re-heated before more hot rolling.[6]
Hot rolled metals generally have little directionality in their mechanical properties and deformation induced residual stresses. However, in certain instances non-metallic inclusions will impart some directionality and workpieces less than 20 mm (0.79 in) thick often have some directional properties. Also, non-uniformed cooling will induce a lot of residual stresses, which usually occurs in shapes that have a non-uniform cross-section, such as I-beams and H-beams. While the finished product is of good quality, the surface is covered in mill scale, which is an oxide that forms at high-temperatures. It is usually removed via pickling or the smooth clean surface process, which reveals a smooth surface.[7] Dimensional tolerances are usually 2 to 5% of the overall dimension.[8]
Hot rolled mild steel seems to have a wider tolerance for amount of included carbon than cold rolled, making it a bit more problematic to use as a blacksmith. Also for similar metals, hot rolled seems to typically be more costly.[9]
Hot rolling is used mainly to produce sheet metal or simple cross sections, such as rail tracks.
Cold rolling

Cold rolling occurs with the metal below its recrystallization temperature (usually at room temperature), which increases the strength via strain hardening up to 20%. It also improves the surface finish and holds tighter tolerances. Commonly cold-rolled products include sheets, strips, bars, and rods; these products are usually smaller than the same products that are hot rolled. Because of the smaller size of the workpieces and their greater strength, as compared to hot rolled stock, four-high or cluster mills are used.[2] Cold rolling cannot reduce the thickness of a workpiece as much as hot rolling in a single pass.
Cold-rolled sheets and strips come in various conditions: full-hard, half-hard, quarter-hard, and skin-rolled. Full-hard rolling reduces the thickness by 50%, while the others involve less of a reduction.Skin-rolling, also known as a skin-pass, involves the least amount of reduction: 0.5-1%. It is used to produce a smooth surface, a uniform thickness, and reduce the yield point phenomenon (by preventing Lüders bands from forming in later processing). It locks dislocations at the surface and thereby reduces the possibility of formation of Lüders bands. To avoid the formation of Lüders bands it is necessary to create substantial density of unpinned dislocations in ferrite matrix. It is also used to breakup the spangles in galvanized steel. Skin-rolled stock is usually used in subsequent cold-working processes where good ductility is required.
Other shapes can be cold-rolled if the cross-section is relatively uniform and the transverse dimension is relatively small. Cold rolling shapes requires a series of shaping operations, usually along the lines of sizing, breakdown, roughing, semi-roughing, semi-finishing, and finishing.
If processed by a blacksmith, the smoother, more consistent, and lower levels of carbon encapsulated in the steel makes it easier to process, but at the cost of being more expensive.[9]
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-05-2012, 08:06 PM
Shoneyboy Shoneyboy is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 30
Thanks: 10
Thanked 6 Times in 4 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by boonesborough View Post
My local vendor can not get any 26 ga sheet, hot or cold rolled. I have looked at Lowes, Fastenal, McMaster Carr with no luck.
Any other sources?

Shay Lelegren
boonesborough, Did you find a vendor yet??? Where are you located ???
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-09-2012, 01:56 PM
boonesborough boonesborough is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

I am in Kentucky but I had to go to Indiana.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-10-2012, 06:58 AM
Shoneyboy Shoneyboy is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 30
Thanks: 10
Thanked 6 Times in 4 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by boonesborough View Post
I am in Kentucky but I had to go to Indiana.
I bought 5 sheets about a month ago, I was just curious about how much the sheets cost you ? I paid 23.75 a sheet 4 x 10’s delivered……
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:50 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.