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Kinks Share your tips and techniques here. The old timers used to refer this as KINKs. Thanks for sharing.


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  #11  
Old 01-12-2011, 03:16 PM
cactassdupree cactassdupree is offline
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Originally Posted by rothalion View Post
FNG I like that. Took me a second to translate...Thank goodness no one touches our machines except myself and one other guy (STG) and the boss. When I first went back to this shop they only had four good fingers on the machine all in the middle and couldn't figure out why everything came out crooked.

Also I had a salesman tell the boss that if you change one finger you should change the whole set...I don't think so, any truth to that?
Who uses the equipment in any shop should be QUALIFIED. We had a nice old Niagara Bar Fold. I came in one morning some yea-yo had tried to smash a bolt for some reason I have yet to figure out. Well he broke the bending bar and now the "Machine" is worthless. If you ever use one you'll know how handy they can be. The thing is cast and machined flat. I have it in a friends garage. He was gonna try and weld it, but he hasn't the skill. (me either). I might take it to the machine shop and see what can be done. Don't want to spend to much. (i got that from my Dad) Peace All dupree
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  #12  
Old 01-13-2011, 09:48 PM
rothalion rothalion is offline
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Originally Posted by MattM View Post
We'd swap one finger at a time if possible. Although you can use 26 ga stainless to make your own, they don't last as long as the spring metal they use. It is a more rigid metal and doesn't crease near as easy.

I liked keeping a set of sawhorses out away from the Autobrake and we built a narrow bench across the top of the Autobrake using 2x4's and 3/4" plywood. You'd be surprised how much it could support on that bench!

If you can it's easier on fingers to do a whole stack on one bend at a time. Less work for the servos. Less temptation to forget that "UP" step when you're out at 28" one second then bringing it in to 3/4" on the next. (The FNG's always forget the UP's.) Not real practical for coping. Works like a charm for some of the smaller stock. And for the right projects its FAST! You really find out how much time you burn while the servos move the fingers in and out. Not a big help for other projects, but if you can get by doing the whole stack one step at a time you save load on the machine.

t's those little things that save you in the long run. Kind of like keeping the strain off your machine on the smash by using the kick out feature. You snap a chain or it gets stretched out over time it costs a small fortune. The little things save you a bundle of money.

Are you saying you 'stack' multiple pieces and bend them all at one time? Not good. If you are worried about time just bend, go to your saw horse table....no build a table with wheels...spin it and when the stack is done done then bend next bend ect.. What are you making that this stacking works with? Aren't your angles tweaked?
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  #13  
Old 01-13-2011, 09:53 PM
rothalion rothalion is offline
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I started out with a Roper 10M14 shear. I will NEVER forget the first time I used a slitter. NEVER!!!!I feel for you. I don't understand why anyone would invest in a 2000 and not a shear. Anytime you work off a back guage your shear accuracy is of the greatest importance. Money saved on bend labor is lost in time spent compansating for shear error....
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  #14  
Old 01-13-2011, 09:57 PM
rothalion rothalion is offline
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Originally Posted by cactassdupree View Post
Who uses the equipment in any shop should be QUALIFIED. We had a nice old Niagara Bar Fold. I came in one morning some yea-yo had tried to smash a bolt for some reason I have yet to figure out. Well he broke the bending bar and now the "Machine" is worthless. If you ever use one you'll know how handy they can be. The thing is cast and machined flat. I have it in a friends garage. He was gonna try and weld it, but he hasn't the skill. (me either). I might take it to the machine shop and see what can be done. Don't want to spend to much. (i got that from my Dad) Peace All dupree
Yea I found a new ding on my shear yesterday...so someone was in the shop. Still I feel fortunate that the machines are pretty safe. I think I am most worried about our Edwards Ironworker...he's my favorite. It seems that folks think that because the machines are big chunks of iron that they are unbreakable...not true as you well know!
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  #15  
Old 01-13-2011, 11:55 PM
metalmanmania metalmanmania is offline
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I wouldnt stack the material and bend it, each pc is a little off, the only thing we do that on is when we are making step shingles, that is it. Not to mention the fact that 3 pcs of 24ga is thicker then 20ga so you would have to make sure you had the appropriate bar on the apron for the heaver guage. I also dont get shops that just bend one bend at a time, yeah I have worked at a union shop that did it that way, they had a 1940's press brake and we manually set up the back gague for each step, it was a damn joke, prior to working there I worked at a shop that I work at now and we used a old chicago hand brake and we could work those guys under with that hand brake, making 1700' a day just two guys, and I am not talking just making a single 90. At the union shop it took me 2 1/2 days to make 500' of gutter.
Now with our autobrake we can do on a pretty good day 3500', we bend each pc from start to finish, most pcs take less then 20 seconds to make multiple bends, and we are done, dont have to touch it again, why do one thing at a time, the machine is set up to run, the backage more then keeps up with me spinning and flipping the pc that I am bending. It makes no sense to me to do the extra work yourself and use it like a dinosaur. Our machine we have had since 1999 as of last week we were at 750,000 clamps to pressure, I just re-lubed the drive chains last week and there is no sign of wear at all, everything is as good as it was the day we got it, and I am sure that we will go another ten years with out any trouble. Maybe if you did 16ga all the time or 14ga it would take a large toll on the machine but I think 22ga and below is a breeze for this machine.
Your bench idea is a good one for holding the material, we however have a pair of brackets that hook on the jaw of the kombi beam and holds our material, the orginal brackets lasted ten years I just remade them a few weeks ago for something to do but it works really well for us.
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  #16  
Old 01-16-2011, 08:19 PM
rothalion rothalion is offline
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500 feet IN A DAY! Id but shot. Its not uncommon for us to get a phone call at2:45 for 500 feet or so for the next morning and we leave at 330. geesh talk about milking a job
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  #17  
Old 01-16-2011, 11:13 PM
metalmanmania metalmanmania is offline
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It wasnt that I was milking the job, it was just the way that they made me fabricate it was totally ass backwards, me and another guy on a hand brake could have been done in 2 hours or more, that shop knew how to make duct work well, and thats it.
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  #18  
Old 01-31-2011, 06:25 PM
MattM MattM is offline
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No, I never bend more than a piece at a time (except for maybe Z's for standing seam panels) and would never put even a manual brake for that. Rather, bend one piece from the stack at a time, only using the same step for the entire stack. You save all that transition time for the brake moving through its paces and that's less your servo motors have to work. I realize it takes time to put the last bent piece down and to pick up the next piece to bend. If you had to do a flip or a roll then its really not much difference in time. This is done to save your Autobrake the wear and tear. For smaller items, like soffit panels, you can do many pieces one step at a time faster than working each and every piece through all the steps one at a time. YMMV
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  #19  
Old 02-02-2011, 04:51 PM
cactassdupree cactassdupree is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rothalion View Post
Yea I found a new ding on my shear yesterday...so someone was in the shop. Still I feel fortunate that the machines are pretty safe. I think I am most worried about our Edwards Ironworker...he's my favorite. It seems that folks think that because the machines are big chunks of iron that they are unbreakable...not true as you well know!
Yeah it makes you want to install a camera.. dupree
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  #20  
Old 02-05-2011, 07:12 PM
rothalion rothalion is offline
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Originally Posted by cactassdupree View Post
Yeah it makes you want to install a camera.. dupree
Haa... we have a camera. It smiles happily down on us all day....
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