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Tinsmith Avenue For those seeking knowledge on past techniques used by yesteryears tinsmiths. The history of Tinsmith goes back in time farther then this place can travel, but for those who want to explore, please share your findings here.


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  #1  
Old 03-13-2011, 04:22 PM
TinplaterSteve TinplaterSteve is offline
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Default Burring machines

Could one of you guys answer a question for me? I am hoping to learn what size disc would the small burring machine be intended for and what size the large burring machine is used for.
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Old 03-13-2011, 06:20 PM
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I only have one machine.
I don't know if it's the large or the small one (I suspect it's the small).
There are no limits to the size of the disc I can turn with it.
The only limitation is the amount of edge.
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Old 03-13-2011, 07:01 PM
TinplaterSteve TinplaterSteve is offline
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Default Burring machine

Ok, I can buy that. But as a newbie can I ask another question? If the size of the machine does not matter, then why is there a large and a small burring machine to chose from?
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Old 03-13-2011, 07:24 PM
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You got me.
However, this thread got me thinking about a visit to Upper Canada Village a few years back.
In the tin shop, there was a tiny burring machine.
They were making small items like candle holders, tin cups, etc.
Maybe I have the large one after all.

http://www.uppercanadavillage.com/uc...x?DetailId=149
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Old 03-14-2011, 06:57 AM
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That is what I always thought....the small one is for turning a burr on small cylinder, for example: A 2" dia. would not even fit over the larger ones.
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Old 03-14-2011, 10:37 PM
tinnerjohn tinnerjohn is offline
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If you check the library section of the forum, Daugherty's 1918 book on sheet metal work has an excellent chapter on burring machines and the burring operation. John
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Old 03-15-2011, 06:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dad View Post
You got me.
However, this thread got me thinking about a visit to Upper Canada Village a few years back.
In the tin shop, there was a tiny burring machine.
They were making small items like candle holders, tin cups, etc.
Maybe I have the large one after all.

http://www.uppercanadavillage.com/uc...x?DetailId=149
So any idea on what gauge they would be using on the old craft items. I wonder if 30 would work? I never did anything but hvac fittings
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Old 03-15-2011, 11:42 AM
tinnerjohn tinnerjohn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bud View Post
So any idea on what gauge they would be using on the old craft items. I wonder if 30 would work? I never did anything but hvac fittings
Based on my limited research (i.e. cross referencing galvanized gauge thickness to tin thickness' listed in old books, 24 to 30 ga., depending on application and end use. My experience has been that tin and black iron work like 1 ga. heavier galv. Example: 26 gauge black iron forms with the effort required for 28 ga. galv. Another post mentioned Barnhart Studios for tin. I recommend them highly. I met Paul at the Tin Tinkers Convergence last summer and bought some tin from him. Great guy to deal with. Hope some of my drivel helps someone. John
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Old 03-15-2011, 07:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bud View Post
So any idea on what gauge they would be using on the old craft items. I wonder if 30 would work? I never did anything but hvac fittings
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinnerjohn View Post
Based on my limited research (i.e. cross referencing galvanized gauge thickness to tin thickness' listed in old books, 24 to 30 ga
I would say 'paper thin'.
No idea what gauge the tin plate is.
The tin shop is very well presented.
Items made in the tin shop are for sale at the gift shop $$$$.
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Old 03-16-2011, 05:18 AM
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Here are a couple of Pexto burring hand forming machines of mine.

I have a Niagara Large Burring Machine I could sell if anyone is interested in this unit.
Attached Thumbnails
small_burring.jpg   Niagara_Large_Burring.jpg   Pexto_wiring_machine.jpg  
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