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Old 06-08-2005, 06:17 PM
pricer pricer is offline
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Default Which Came First ?

I have been researching traditional tinsmithing, mainly on the tools used for soldering. After reading a book about the Colonial Craftsmen, it is said that the tinner, tinker, traveled from town to town with his trusty pig and his soldering furnace. In my way of thinking, his furnace must have been light in weight in order for him to have traveled on foot with it from town to town.

My guess at this point is that it was made of tin with a steel fire pot in the bottom of it. I guess this is not a case of which came first but a case of where you were and what you did. I would think that if a tinner was on foot, he used a furnace made of tin. If a tinner were lucky enough to have a shop in a larger town, he would have a much heavier cast iron furnace.

I am trying to get a clearer picture of the history of the tinner. I would like to hear more about the history of our trade.
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Old 06-08-2005, 09:05 PM
bordontn bordontn is offline
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Pricer...the picture I sent in of the fire pot.It was made of sheet iron.
Maybe 20 ga. at the heaviest The top and bottom are "paned" but not "knocked up".That would be the bottom and top turned once. Like the bttm on a revere style
lantern instead of a tin can..They did walk but pulled a wagon with their wares.I'm
sure with large wheels as the roads weren't much them days.
bordontn
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Old 06-08-2005, 10:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bordontn
Pricer...the picture I sent in of the fire pot.It was made of sheet iron.
Maybe 20 ga. at the heaviest The top and bottom are "paned" but not "knocked up".That would be the bottom and top turned once. Like the bttm on a revere style
lantern instead of a tin can..They did walk but pulled a wagon with their wares.I'm
sure with large wheels as the roads weren't much them days.
bordontn
Had to of been tough in those days. I guess it was all just relitive to the times. I read where the sheets they used in early America were hammered out and a large sheet was about 12 x 18. You know those guys had to be careful with there work or it was back to the hammer. The book I am reading now talks about all of the early trades. Very intresting, especialy when it came to masters and apprentices, masters pretty much took care of them for 7 years. Masters provided them room and board and it would seem as if they were a family of sorts.

Boy, if they could see us now.
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Old 06-11-2005, 08:37 PM
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Default Paul Revere and his copper mill

A Bit of Tinner History

After doing a bit of research on the Internet I will post what I find as an index to other websites that we can learn more about our trade and how we came to beIf you find something of interest please email me the link and Ill add it to our list.

Did you know Paul Revere had his own copper mill? Read more


http://www.canton.org/history/revere1.htm
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Old 06-11-2005, 08:48 PM
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Luigi Galvani discovered the basis for Galvanizing, but wasn't applied to the metal until 1837 by H.W.Crawford..

http://www.geocities.com/bioelectroc...ry/galvani.htm
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Old 06-11-2005, 09:03 PM
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All Zinc was imported up until 1860 when it was first commercially smelted in the US..

More on Zinc

http://www.personal.psu.edu/users/m/...ssignment.html
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