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  #1  
Old 10-20-2013, 05:33 PM
JamesL JamesL is offline
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Default Hand Crimper

Newbie would like recommendation for a
good quality hand crimper. Please
opine on max gage it will handle. Thanks, Jim
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  #2  
Old 10-21-2013, 03:31 PM
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Well, I'm still using the same Malco crimpers that I bought in 1980.
The spring went out of them about 1982, but I still use them to this day with no spring.
As far as gauge goes, we don't usually work with anything heavier than 24 gauge and they work just fine.
I can't imagine hand crimping anything heavier than that.
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Old 10-21-2013, 04:55 PM
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Wink yeap

i second the malcos.. all the five times i have used them in ten years
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Old 10-21-2013, 08:57 PM
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We have a set at the shop. They work well for what we do. 99% of the time I use them for crimping wood stove flue joints. most of the standard stuff is 24ga steel. Occasionally we run into stainless. They work on that too, but man I usually get hand cramps several times before I finish.
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Old 10-23-2013, 10:56 PM
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The Malco five tine crimpers are okay, but I like the single myself. No springs in them either, but much handier doing corners and heavier metal. I can crease 22 gauge with them whereas the five tine barely leave marks in that stuff. (the five leaves a triple 'v' pattern whereas the single leaves a single 'v') I've broke too many snips and nibblers to prove they would do the trick. I don't care to break another tool when I have one that works.

The crimpers get lots of work doing outlets and for making stack extensions. Mostly outdoors stuff.
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  #6  
Old 10-25-2013, 04:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MattM View Post
The Malco five tine crimpers are okay, but I like the single myself. (the five leaves a triple 'v' pattern whereas the single leaves a single 'v')
We do mostly HVAC work, and some days we crimp a lot of pipe.
The five tine crimpers are a little easier on the hands and wrists.
By the way, if you're ever stuck without a pair of crimpers, all you need is a pair of needle nose pliers.
Oldest trick in the book.
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Old 10-25-2013, 05:07 PM
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Sorry, that's not the oldest trick.
The coat hanger trick is the oldest and the best.
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  #8  
Old 10-25-2013, 05:58 PM
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Default Coat Hanger Trick

Ok- I'll bite- what is the coat hanger trick?
Please and thank you.
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Old 10-26-2013, 01:59 PM
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As long as you don't mind the thread hijack, as it has little to do with hand crimpers.
Wire coat hangers are great for pilot bits.
What we do is cut the straight pieces out.
You get about 6" out of the shoulders and about 12" out of the bottom.
Cut the ends on an angle like a chisel point, and these things will drill through practically anything.
On retrofits we can drill through the finished flooring to see where we are in relation to joists etc.
Multiple uses.
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  #10  
Old 10-28-2013, 05:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob View Post
As long as you don't mind the thread hijack, as it has little to do with hand crimpers.
Wire coat hangers are great for pilot bits.
What we do is cut the straight pieces out.
You get about 6" out of the shoulders and about 12" out of the bottom.
Cut the ends on an angle like a chisel point, and these things will drill through practically anything.
On retrofits we can drill through the finished flooring to see where we are in relation to joists etc.
Multiple uses.
Great, I learned something new already today...now I can coast through the rest of day BTW, I use the Malco 5 blade as well (as little as possible)
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