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  #1  
Old 01-21-2014, 06:49 PM
sawdust sawdust is offline
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Default Help needed for a round hopper

I am trying to duplicate a round hopper for a feed grinder. I am not a sheet metal worker, but I enjoy the challenge of sheet metal fabrication. The original round hopper has a double seam or a ACME lock, but I consider it to be on the inside. I am using 26 gauge, but I tried using an old hand cranked Peck, Stow, Wilcox double seamer, but did not have any luck on the radius getting the seam vertical and it crinkled on the inside. I also have a Pexto 622 and tried using it with no luck. What would be the best way to go about doing this and is it possible to do this with the seamers that I have? Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
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  #2  
Old 01-22-2014, 12:50 AM
MattM MattM is offline
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You need the wire seamer and some appropriate wire to form the top. It's probably easiest on the vertical seam to use a seaming block tool like you would use on outlets. Leave an open hem on each side of the material facing opposite directions, pull them together, then smash them locked with the seamer. I would want it soldered afterwards for stiffness.

If you look through Bud's archives you will see all the techniques you need.
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  #3  
Old 01-23-2014, 07:55 PM
sawdust sawdust is offline
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Thanks for the reply. If I understand your post correctly, that is what I am trying to do. The problem I am having is on the bottom half. The helm is going to have to be turned up to 45 degrees to be vertical. I am having a hard time trying to make it vertical, then I try to roll the top edge to in the inside and it gets very wrinkly with flat spots. I also tried putting the helm on before rolling it round with no luck. I am trying to make it like the original one with the joint on the outside. I may try it with the seam on the outside but it won’t have an offset in it to help it stay together if it gets any pressure from the top. If anyone has any suggestions on this or a different type of ridged joint it would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 01-24-2014, 02:03 PM
MattM MattM is offline
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If I understand correctly your trouble is reducing the material as you form the double lock?
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Old 01-24-2014, 02:43 PM
sawdust sawdust is offline
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Yes, I am having no luck forming the metal without distorting it. I guess my real question is, what would be the appropriate steps and procedures?
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Old 01-24-2014, 05:35 PM
smwlocal24 smwlocal24 is offline
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I suggest connecting the two pieces in an easier way. There is no added benefit to having a hook seam. Try making the lower round taper piece such that the top has a raw edge. Then make the upper piece so that it will have tabs extending below the top edge of the round taper piece. Cut slits or v-notches in the tab/overlap area to form these small tabs. They should be about 0.5" long and approximately 0.75" wide. These tabs may be bent to align with the lower piece prior to mating them. Use the smallest pop rivet available that will hold the two pieces together and then solder with lead-free solder. To solder sheet metal it is easiest and best to use a soldering iron (not the kind used for electronics).
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  #7  
Old 01-25-2014, 06:16 AM
MattM MattM is offline
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I think you're making it more complicated than it needs to be. You form your lower piece and top piece with the vertical seam open. Slide it in from one side. Lock your vertical seam.
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  #8  
Old 01-25-2014, 07:45 AM
sawdust sawdust is offline
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I am trying to duplicate the original as close as possible and trying to stay away from rivets and solider. I want the bottom lock made neatly and efficiently as i can to try to match the original. If I can get the bottom lock formed, I have 20 of them to make.
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Old 01-25-2014, 01:26 PM
smwlocal24 smwlocal24 is offline
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Since you are committed to the hook seam, you should form the lower round tapered piece without forming the hem yet. Then notch the hem area with snips into 1" tabs. Next form the hem by hand with tongs.

The upper piece should be easier. Fold the hem with a brake and place 2 strips of 26 gauge inside the hem before smashing. Roll the top piece with the 26 gauge strips in place. Remove the 26 gauge strips and you should have a relatively open hem. Hook the hems together from the upper and lower pieces and hammer together with a seaming die to form a tight seem.
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Old 01-25-2014, 01:58 PM
MattM MattM is offline
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I think my wording was maybe too myopic. The central seam that holds top and bottom is formed so that you can attach them together while the vertical seam is still open. The vertical seam gets closed last and gives everything the tension to pull itself together. Smwlocal24 expressed an easy way to keep the double lapping side open as you form it. The single lock side on the bottom piece is trickier since you form it on a piece that is more difficult to wrap our head around due to its nature of being asymmetrical. To slip the two pieces together you need them rolled into their curved shape, so leave the 26 gauge strips in until after you run them through the rollers. Take your strips out and slide the double-lock lap together. Your vertical seam completes the work. A seaming die is the best option IMHO to complete the vertical seam. However, they don't hold up well and have to have something to keep them bonded. If the vertical seam has to be held without bonding (solder, etc.) then you will need a double lock there, too.
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