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-   -   4 way seam intersection: irregular hip (http://www.sheetmetaltalk.com/showthread.php?t=2570)

Kurtis 06-25-2014 05:48 AM

4 way seam intersection: irregular hip
 
I posted this article over on the Casa B blog about specialty seaming.

http://casabuenabuilders.wordpress.c...intersections/

Milo 06-25-2014 10:40 AM

Kurtis,
Thanks for posting these "tutorials". It seems that many of these techniques are being lost to the ages with the craftsmen taking them to the grave (that is the making of various sheet metal details that are weatherproof without the aid of modern sealents, soldering, welding, etc). Although I can find mention of many of these techniques in some of the old publications it is rare that any are explained in any great detail. I have been bookmarking and saving these "tutorials" so keep them coming.

MILO

Kurtis 06-25-2014 03:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kurtis (Post 16362)
I posted this article over on the Casa B blog about specialty seaming.

http://casabuenabuilders.wordpress.c...intersections/

Sorry folks, I posted that from the phone.

This is not a tutorial per say. But I'd be happy to go into more detail on here.
I have to thank Ben Phanco for showing me the flat seam pattern. I've been working it in paper for about a year and this is the first one I have attempted in copper. I'm not new to architectural sheet metal or roofing, but I am new to this "complete" method of seaming.

Milo: although the trade is "dead" as you say here: I don't actually think there is much of an american precedent in the past for this type of seaming. Certainly the tin-nockers and cornice men of that day could have executed any of this work, it is not difficult if you are already versed in sheet metal and pattern making. However I don't see a lot of historical evidence of these techniques used in old roofs. Tin was laid with hand locked standing seams, however the corners were usually neatly folded and soldered. Since paint was being applied it was a sufficient technique. These roofs some of them last 80 to 100 years, so... good show!

I'm not actually debating that this is better than that old american method, I think it was very well done metalwork, and proper roofing. Using copper to execute the same old american style of standing seam intended for terneplate is a mistake though. Because of this I have adopted the swiss/german (as I have come to know it) style of standing seam. This is the concept of seaming through all penetrations and transitions. If it has a pitch, it can be seamed as I am learning.

I will scan some photos of the layout and post a proper tutorial. It's really easy and fun to try on a model too!

Milo 06-25-2014 07:24 PM

I'm looking foreward to seeing more of this "Swiss/German" method. The most in depth publication I have found on standing seam work is put out by the British CDA "Copper Roofing in Detail". Although this publication goes into more depth about standing seam work than the US CDA and Revere's copper roofing documents it still doesnt cover the examples you have shown. Is there a publication or source which covers these methods?
I guess it is fitting to see that the Germans have there own methods of working with roofing metal as they have the slating aspect covered too (Altdeutsche Deckung,Schuppen style,etc)

MILO

Kurtis 06-26-2014 07:22 AM

That was the problem exactly! There is not enough information and CDA is really no help. There is a book I know of: it is a german textbook with a ton of details in it, but I've never seen it. The English version is available on german websites but I haven't been able to order. Most of these I figured out with the help of other roofers and a lot of practice with paper patterns

Milo 06-26-2014 11:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kurtis (Post 16370)
... There is a book I know of: it is a german textbook with a ton of details in it, but I've never seen it. The English version is available on german websites but I haven't been able to order...

Do you have the web address that shows this book?

Thanks,
MILO

Kurtis 06-26-2014 11:54 AM

milo it's called "details in sheet metal working techniques". The author is a hyphenated "Jung-verlag"

There is also supposedly a very detailed book put out by KME but I've never seen it anywhere

Milo 06-26-2014 07:53 PM

I did find these two publications off of a KME site but not sure if this is these are of the manual you mention:

http://www2.kme.com/xml/attachment/6...glisch_neu.pdf


http://www.metalcom.co.il/userfiles/...nual_GB(1).pdf

Here is mention of an updated CD ROM version http://www.kme.com/en/pressrelease/detail/426

I also found the book "Details in Sheet Metal Working Tecniques"...it is even 5% off....but it is in New Zealand!: http://www.fribesco.com/#
MILO

lyonsco1 06-30-2014 04:43 PM

The books you're looking for are here along with a video. Just write them an email and they'll answer you in english in a few days; last time I bought something I think they sent me a paypal link and I had my stuff in 10 days.
This company has all the really cool stuff we can't get in the US.

http://shop.maschinen-stockert.de/sh...16c7cf5e6e41b5

Kurtis 06-30-2014 07:20 PM

Thanks Lyons


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